Putney Stories

Angie Wood

on Jul 27th 2008

by Stuart Strothman, August 2002, at Angie Wood’s apartment at 91 Main Street

When Angie Wood was three years old, a woman who had been involved in the founding of Northfield Mount Hermon came to New York City, and came to know Angie’s mother, who was young with many children, and little Angie, the fifth, was sick with the flu that took so many lives during World War I. This woman, Mrs. Dunklee, brought Angie to live in the healthier climate of Vernon, Vermont, where she stayed until first grade. Read the entire post: Angie Wood

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Father James Coombs

on Jul 27th 2008

by Stuart Strothman, August 2002, at the rectory on Old Depot Rd.

Father James Coombs, who resided at the Catholic rectory on Old Depot Road, first came to Putney in 1942 for summer vacations.  His grandfather had lived in Vermont, working as a stonecutter in West Dummerston, and so his father was born here, and had come to know the area’s native beauty; in fact, all of Father Coombs’ brothers and sisters were born in West Dummerston.  Read the entire post: Father James Coombs

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Doris Fredericks

on Jul 27th 2008

by Michael C. Morello, Landmark student, April 2002

Doris Fredericks, owner of the Clay School, has been a citizen of Putney, Vermont since 1978.  Her past has had many twists and turns, which eventually led her to this small semi-rural town in southern Vermont. Read the entire post: Doris Fredericks

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Ines Zeller

on Jul 27th 2008

by Mark Rosen, Landmark student, April 2002

This year, writers of a historical book about Putney relied on engagement of volunteers who interviewed and wrote summaries about people, organizations, businesses, and places in Putney. These materials will be used to make statements about general themes and trends regarding town life in the last 50 years. The purpose of my interview was to interview a Putney resident with intercultural ties about living in Putney, and to gather a sense of some typical occurrences in daily life. Read the entire post: Ines Zeller

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Curtis All American B-B-Q

on Jul 27th 2008

by Vashon Townshend, Landmark student, May 2002

In an effort to learn about the history of Putney, Vermont from the perspective of one of its citizens, I interviewed Mr.Curtis Tuff, an African American, who owns Curtis’ Barbecue in Putney. The following are the results of that interview.

Curtis arrived in Putney many years ago following his involvement in a counterculture community, which he said was mostly a recreational experience. He explained that his life was very “laid back” and peaceful. From the beginning of his time in Putney, he enjoyed living in the mountains and the open spaces. Read the entire post: Curtis All American B-B-Q

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William Graham: Law enforcement in Putney

on Jul 27th 2008

By Stuart Strothman, June 2002

For every land where reasonable law is held as the standard for society, there must be people to enforce the law. These people are in a demanding position, not only because bravery and clarity are required as a matter of course, but because a careful balance must be found between law enforcement, peacekeeping, and respect for the constitutional rights of citizens. William Graham, as a longtime citizen and well-respected law enforcement officer in the town of Putney, with more than thirty years spent as Windham County Sheriff, seems to have created a comfortable balance in his lifetime, as has Henry Farnum, also of Putney, fourteen years his chief deputy and recently county sheriff. Though many people in Windham may not realize, citizens of the town of Putney have played a very important role in the development of reliable law enforcement, county wide. Read the entire post: William Graham: Law enforcement in Putney

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Olive Frost

on Jul 27th 2008

By Laurel Ellis, August 23, 2006

In our busy here and now it’s hard to imagine how different everything will be at some unknown time in the future. Today’s minor hardships could even be remembered with a touch of nostalgia for the related memories of simpler and otherwise happy times. Sometimes it’s someone else’s memory that enriches our sense of everyday life at a time and place we could never experience first hand. Like a good novel but much more real. Such was the feeling enjoyed when talking with Olive Frost in August, 2006. Read the entire post: Olive Frost

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Ellie Lascore: Waitress, Putney Diner

on Jul 27th 2008

Interview and transcription by Paul Levasseur, April 2007

This is the best job in the world for anybody like me.

I had a very tough childhood, but as I grew older it got better, through my work. That’s what made me happy, I found out.

This is the best job in the world for anybody like me. You know, you can meet nice people, you have a good time, and you get paid for having a good time! I mean I just met so many wonderful people, and it’s never been a job for me. It’s been a good time, all the time. My kids can’t get over that, or anyone that knows me can’t get over that. Read the entire post: Ellie Lascore: Waitress, Putney Diner

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