Articles

The Putney Fire Department

on Jul 27th 2008

By Stuart Strothman and Laurel Ellis, August 2005

Putney has long been rightfully proud of its fire department, which in 2004 responded to a record 343 calls, and gave 4300 additional volunteer hours over to maintenance, education, and training. As we look forward to our new firehouse on the solid ground of the old salt shed property across from the Co-op, it seems like a good time to look back and consider some of the ways our fire department has served our community, and how things have changed over the years. Read the entire post: The Putney Fire Department

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80 Years and Still Going Strong: The Putney Community Center

on Jul 27th 2008

By Laurel Ellis and Leon Cooper, August, 2005

The history of the Putney Community Center can be said to rightly begin even before the construction of the Baptist Meeting House Church which was to become its home.

The 1883 Meeting House deed indicates that a one-family dwelling house was already standing on the site where the Church was slated to be built. A close examination of the present structure makes a strong case for the rear portion of the building being in fact the dwelling house referred to in the 1883 deed. An exterior-wall window is still visible from the interior stairway leading to the second floor, making it clear that the rear part of the building must have once stood as an independent structure. Read the entire post: 80 Years and Still Going Strong: The Putney Community Center

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Pierce’s Hall

on Jul 27th 2008

According to three documents written around 1953 for the first Putney town history, the beautiful brick building known as Pierce’s Hall was erected in 1831, “for a Methodist meeting house.”  It has a foundation of long, beam-shaped granite slabs hauled from West Dummerston, and the brick came from Timothy Underwood’s brickyard on River Road.  When the second meeting house was built in 1842, the Hall was sold to Leroy Pierce, “who used it for storage of corn, and kept sheep underneath the building.”  There are some records of dances held in the building earlier than 1873, and in 1880 Norman and Mary (Carr) Cobb celebrated their wedding at the Hall.  “It is stated that their six sons…drew their parents down in a sleigh from their home to the gala event.”  Around 1881, the building was refurbished for use as a meeting house. Read the entire post: Pierce’s Hall

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Obsidian in Vermont: Analysis of an Arrowhead in the Gerald Coane Collection

on Jul 27th 2008

by Matthew T. Boulanger, Archaeometry Laboratory, University of Missouri Research Reactor and Thomas R. Jamison, Hartgen Archeological Associates, Inc., Putney, Vermont

Introduction

Archaeologists are particularly interested in identifying evidence of prehistoric long-distance trade and exchange, and artifacts made from stone are some of the best records of such exchange because they can be traced back to specific geological outcrops. Archaeologists often develop an intuitive knowledge about the types of stone and their potential sources that were used prehistorically. In Vermont for example, most archaeologists recognize quartzite from the Cheshire formation or chert from the Champlain Valley. But, when archaeologists encounter an artifact made from stone not found in their region of inquiry, they use the term “exotic” to describe it.

Occurrences of so-called exotic artifacts are not uncommon in Vermont. Read the entire post: Obsidian in Vermont: Analysis of an Arrowhead in the Gerald Coane Collection

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