Archive: July, 2008

PHS receives Thwing Mill in 2002

on Jul 31st 2008

In 2002 the Historical Society received the Thwing Mill as a gift from Greg Wilson. Last operated by Charlie and Mary Thwing for 58 years, the mill closed shortly before Charlie’s death in 1946.

We continue to hold great hope for the mill’s potential to enhance our mission of education, preservation, and fostering respect for the town’s history. Now that the gift has been accepted, we remain in the second phase of project development–engaging prospective supporters in preparing a plan for use that can be phased in as funds allow.

If you are interested in participating with the further development of a plan or simply supporting the project, please contact Lyssa Papazian.

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The New Putney History Book, Published in 2003

on Jul 31st 2008

As a special event to celebrate Putney’s 250th charter anniversary, the Putney Historical Society Board decided to update the town history, first prepared in 1953 by the Fortnightly Club. Planning for town wide participation began in 1999. Interviewing was conducted for two years. Well over 200 people contributed by interviewing, being interviewed, taking notes, donating photos, writing, editing, and reviewing many versions of the manuscript. Read the entire post: The New Putney History Book, Published in 2003

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Reliefs of Historic Putney Houses Restored at PCS

on Jul 28th 2008

In 2002, through a grant from the Strolling of the Heifers Foundation, a project coordinated by the Putney Historical Society combined efforts of Putney Central students and teachers, Putney farmers and residents, and Putney artists.  PHS volunteers walked students to various sites  around town. Read the entire post: Reliefs of Historic Putney Houses Restored at PCS

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Town Hall Entry Newly Painted

on Jul 28th 2008

The Putney Town Hall was constructed in 1871 as a proud example of Victorian architecture in post-Civil War Putney.  Sporting many attractive architectural features in the entry, it provided a locus for innumerable town events including dances, plays, dinners, veterans’ gatherings, and the annual town meeting.  Sometime before 1950, the beautiful foyer received a light blue coat of paint, over a previous, dark green coat.  No attempt was made to highlight architectural features of the building at that time; the trim and the walls were given the same thick coat of semi-gloss. Read the entire post: Town Hall Entry Newly Painted

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Angie Wood

on Jul 27th 2008

by Stuart Strothman, August 2002, at Angie Wood’s apartment at 91 Main Street

When Angie Wood was three years old, a woman who had been involved in the founding of Northfield Mount Hermon came to New York City, and came to know Angie’s mother, who was young with many children, and little Angie, the fifth, was sick with the flu that took so many lives during World War I. This woman, Mrs. Dunklee, brought Angie to live in the healthier climate of Vernon, Vermont, where she stayed until first grade. Read the entire post: Angie Wood

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Father James Coombs

on Jul 27th 2008

by Stuart Strothman, August 2002, at the rectory on Old Depot Rd.

Father James Coombs, who resided at the Catholic rectory on Old Depot Road, first came to Putney in 1942 for summer vacations.  His grandfather had lived in Vermont, working as a stonecutter in West Dummerston, and so his father was born here, and had come to know the area’s native beauty; in fact, all of Father Coombs’ brothers and sisters were born in West Dummerston.  Read the entire post: Father James Coombs

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Doris Fredericks

on Jul 27th 2008

by Michael C. Morello, Landmark student, April 2002

Doris Fredericks, owner of the Clay School, has been a citizen of Putney, Vermont since 1978.  Her past has had many twists and turns, which eventually led her to this small semi-rural town in southern Vermont. Read the entire post: Doris Fredericks

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Partial List of Interviews—History of Putney, 2003

on Jul 27th 2008

The following is a partial list of interviews conducted during the writing of the 2003 history: Putney: World’s Best Known Small Town. Arcadia, 2003.  Most are unrecorded by audio or video. Read the entire post: Partial List of Interviews—History of Putney, 2003

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Ines Zeller

on Jul 27th 2008

by Mark Rosen, Landmark student, April 2002

This year, writers of a historical book about Putney relied on engagement of volunteers who interviewed and wrote summaries about people, organizations, businesses, and places in Putney. These materials will be used to make statements about general themes and trends regarding town life in the last 50 years. The purpose of my interview was to interview a Putney resident with intercultural ties about living in Putney, and to gather a sense of some typical occurrences in daily life. Read the entire post: Ines Zeller

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Curtis All American B-B-Q

on Jul 27th 2008

by Vashon Townshend, Landmark student, May 2002

In an effort to learn about the history of Putney, Vermont from the perspective of one of its citizens, I interviewed Mr.Curtis Tuff, an African American, who owns Curtis’ Barbecue in Putney. The following are the results of that interview.

Curtis arrived in Putney many years ago following his involvement in a counterculture community, which he said was mostly a recreational experience. He explained that his life was very “laid back” and peaceful. From the beginning of his time in Putney, he enjoyed living in the mountains and the open spaces. Read the entire post: Curtis All American B-B-Q

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